OPLSS 2016

April 11, 2016

The program for OPLSS 2016 has been announced, and we are open for registration!

This year’s instance is being organized by Zena Ariola, Dan Licata, and me, with renewed emphasis this year on programming languages semantics and verification.

Oregon Programming Languages Summer School
June 20-July 2, 2016
Eugene, Oregon

There are still spaces available at the 15th Annual Oregon Programming
Languages Summer School (OPLSS).

Please encourage your PhD students, masters students, advanced
undergraduates, colleagues, and selves to attend!

This year’s program is titled Types, Logic, Semantics, and Verification and features the following courses:

* Programming Languages Background — Robert Harper, Carnegie Mellon University and Dan Licata, Wesleyan University
* Category Theory Background — Ed Morehouse, Carnegie Mellon University
* Logical Relations — Patricia Johann, Appalachian State University
* Network Programming — Nate Foster, Cornell University
* Automated Complexity Analysis — Jan Hoffman, Carnegie Mellon University
* Separation Logic and Concurrency — Aleks Nanevski, IMDEA
* Principles of Type Refinement — Noam Zeilberger, INRIA
* Logical relations/Compiler verification — Amal Ahmed, Northeastern University

Full information on the courses and registration and scholarships is
available at https://www.cs.uoregon.edu/research/summerschool/.

For more information, please email summerschool@cs.uoregon.edu.

 


Practical Foundations for Programming Languages, Second Edition

April 11, 2016

Today I received my copies of Practical Foundations for Programming Languages, Second Edition on Cambridge University Press.  The new edition represents a substantial revision and expansion of the first edition, including these:

  1. A new chapter on type refinements has been added, complementing previous chapters on dynamic typing and on sub-typing.
  2. Two old chapters were removed (general pattern matching, polarization), and several chapters were very substantially rewritten (higher kinds, inductive and co-inductive types, concurrent and distributed Algol).
  3. The parallel abstract machine was revised to correct an implied extension that would have been impossible to carry out.
  4. Numerous corrections and improvements were made throughout, including memorable and pronounceable names for languages.
  5. Exercises were added to the end of each chapter (but the last).  Solutions are available separately.
  6. The index was revised and expanded, and some conventions systematized.
  7. An inexcusably missing easter egg was inserted.

I am grateful to many people for their careful reading of the text and their suggestions for correction and improvement.

In writing this book I have attempted to organize a large body of material on programming language concepts, all presented in the unifying framework of type systems and structural operational semantics.  My goal is to give precise definitions that provide a clear basis for discussion and a foundation for both analysis and implementation.  The field needs such a foundation, and I hope to have helped provide one.